explore-blog:

Gorgeous cover for the British edition of Philip Pullman’s retelling of the Grimm fairy tales by designer Cheong-ah Hwang.

explore-blog:

Gorgeous cover for the British edition of Philip Pullman’s retelling of the Grimm fairy tales by designer Cheong-ah Hwang.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

3. This happened today (Taken with Instagram)

3. This happened today (Taken with Instagram)

2. Lunchtime sushi! #FMSphotoaday (Taken with Instagram)

2. Lunchtime sushi! #FMSphotoaday (Taken with Instagram)

Review: The Maze Runner - James Dashner - BOOK 1


Another YA book, I didn’t realise this was a trilogy until I got to the end.

And was I excited? YES!

This novel has been compared toThe Hunger Games, and whilst it is similar, I would hesitate to compare it as far as themes go.  Those who have read THG will certainly enjoy this book, but Dashner takes us on a different story.  Instead of killing each other off, this is a story of teens coming together to fight a common enemy.

Our characters wake up to find themselves in a place they haven’t been before, with their memories wiped clear.  They all have to work together to stay alive, and to beat the menacing ‘greivers’ that hunt at night.  There is a huge maze in which they believe there is an exit, but the walls move each night, causing confusion.

Can they get out of the maze? Can they find safety? And where have their memories gone? Who is controlling their envvironment, and why?

Excellent read. In fact, I’ve just gone and borrowed book two, The Scorch Trails from the library!

Review: The Gilded Chamber - Rebecca Kohn.


This novel was neither great nor terrible, but sits somewhere in between.  I picked it up because on the front cover it exclaims that any reader of The Red Tent (Anita Diamant) will love this book. 

'Nuff said. It was in my hot little hands before I realised it.

It is the story of Queen Esther who is taken into service by the King as his concubine, then later is made his Queen.  Esther has been hiding her history as a Jew, and succeeds in doing so until a plan by the King to kill the Jews is made and Esther finds herself planning and plotting the best way she knows how to try and save her people, and herself.

Entertwined amongst this story, is the one of the women of the harem - the other concubines, and their daily rituals, their competitive natures and their bonds of friendship.

It’s quite a good look at court life of the underdogs during that century and the story is well told. It just could have been more exciting.

booksdirect:

Reading nook.

Oh. Yes. Yes. Yes.

booksdirect:

Reading nook.

Oh. Yes. Yes. Yes.

(Source: dnl256, via somethingbookish)

Review - The Long Walk - Stephen King


 Ray Garraty, along with 99 other teenage boys, has entered a competition. A race of sorts, where one must continually walk for several days and nights without falling below 4 miles an hour.  If you fall below that speed, you gain a warning.  After the third warning, if you don’t pick up speed you get shot.

Simple.

Terrible and disturbing.

King gathers a host of characters through the novel, each character one of the Long Walk competitors.  We see at the beginning a bunch of typical smart ass, overconfident macho man-boys who, slowly but surely wither away throughout the gruelling Long Walk until there is one left standing.

A psychological and dark story, the only thing I was disappointed with was the ending.  It felt as though King had suddenly gotten sick of writing and just written a couple of sentences to ‘tie up lose ends’.  I was absolutely expecting something more profound to occur, or to be said, and was left feeling really annoyed and disappointed that I’d read the entire (fairly lengthy) novel to get an ending like that.

Review: Daniel Isn’t Talking - Marti Leimbach


I am unsure if this novel is a true story, however the way it was written I wouldn’t be surprised.

Daniel is our main character, a small boy.  He has a mother, a father and a sister.  It is a happy family, until Daniel is diagnosed with autism and the happy family starts to unravel at the seams.

Mum visits every possible doctor and specialist, hoping for a glimmer of hope amongst a sea of people who tell her that not much can be done for little Daniel.

Dad runs back to an ex girlfriend and leaves the family home, unable to cope with the fact that his little boy isn’t perfect.

Mum Melanie discovers a man who calls himself a Play Therapist.  He has no qualifications, no formal training, but he’s the only man who is able to teach Daniel to talk and play and interact.

A story of desperation, hope and a mother who would do anything for her child, this novel is absolutely a joy to read and a must for any mother.